Cf march082021 2006 quintarelli amarone

Cellar Favorite: 2006 Quintarelli Amarone della Valpolicella Classico

cellar favorite, Cellar Favorites, Italy: North

Antonio Galloni, Mar 2021

This bottle of Quintarelli’s 2006 Amarone della Valpolicella Classico made me feel like I was back in the cellar, tasting with the man himself, as I was lucky to do a few times before his passing.

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Valpolicella & Soave: The Times, They Are A Changin’

featured, Italy: North

Eric Guido, Feb 2021

Veneto is home to a number of oenological riches, from the whites of Soave to the reds of the Valpolicella district, including the renowned Amarone, one of Italy’s most important wines. The region’s most dynamic, passionate producers are determined to show that their wines stand in stark contrast to the at times indifferent wines that once penalized the image of these appellations in the mind of the consumer.

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Friuli Venezia Giulia – In Constant Motion

featured, Italy: North

Eric Guido, Jan 2021

This is not quite Italy, Austria or Slovenia; it is distinctly Friuli Venezia Giulia, and what forward-thinking producers in the region have accomplished through decades of toying and tinkering to find that perfect mix has created a kaleidoscope of styles from ancient to international to completely experimental.

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Italy’s Sparkling Advantage: Prosecco and Franciacorta

featured, Italy: North

Eric Guido, Dec 2020

The holidays are upon us. It’s the season where more bubbly is purchased and consumed than at any other time of the year. Whether it’s for gifting, celebrating or the perfect pairing at your holiday meal, a bottle of bubbly always fits the bill. This report looks at Prosecco and Franciacorta, two of Italy’s greatest treasures.

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Trentino & Alto Adige: Worlds Apart

featured, Italy: North

Eric Guido, Nov 2020

As if engrossed in a Tolkienesque fantasy novel, we delve into the labyrinth of producers, varieties, labels, languages and the diverse terroirs of Trentino and Alto Adige. However, while traversing this realm where Italian meets Austrian meets German, it quickly becomes apparent that the effort we put in to comprehending its people and the array of fascinating and stimulating wines they produce is truly worthwhile. Together, let's take a trip down the rabbit hole to better understand two of Italy’s most under-the-radar regions.

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The Grand Vin of the North: San Leonardo

featured, Italy: North, Verticals & Retrospectives

Eric Guido, Jul 2020

When we think of Italy’s highly successful experiments with Bordeaux blends, it’s often the coast of Tuscany that comes to mind. But what if I told you that one of the country’s grandest wines hails from the north instead, in the region of Trentino? I invite you to explore the past, present and future of Tenuta San Leonardo through one of the most riveting verticals ever assembled.

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Nebbiolo in Its Many Guises: Alto Piemonte & Valtellina

featured, Italy: North, Italy: Piedmont

Antonio Galloni, apr 2020

There is no question that Nebbiolo is one of the world’s greatest and most noble red grapes. An ability to convey the essence of site and vintage through the lens of producer style places Nebbiolo in rarified company. Once consumers experience the magic of Nebbiolo – most often through the wines of the Langhe – it is only natural to ask: What else is out there? The answer is Alto Piemonte and Valtellina, two separate and distinct regions, both of which offer so much to explore.

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Venica & Venica Friulano Collio Ronco delle Cime 1990–2017

featured, Italy: North

Ian D'Agata, Mar 2020

Venica’s Ronco delle Cime is one of Italy’s benchmark Friulanos. Sleek and refined, it ages well, never losing its crisp, juicy character and food-friendly personality.

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Schiopetto Friulano: 1992-2017

featured, Italy: North

Ian D'Agata, Mar 2020

Mario Schiopetto is considered the father of modern Friuli Venezia Giulia (FVG) wines. Before his arrival, FVG wines garnered mostly local interest and were consumed fairly quickly after the harvest. But Schiopetto’s wines were clean, precise, mineral and ageworthy, and they rapidly gained an international following, literally putting FVG on the map. Schiopetto’s Friulano, first made in 1965, has long been one of the region’s gold standards for this iconic indigenous variety.

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Alto Adige: On a Roll

featured, Italy: North

Ian D'Agata, Feb 2020

Readers will find some of Italy’s best wines in Alto Adige, the northerly mountain region that borders Austria. It is here that the country’s top white wines are made, while there are increasingly more compelling reds to choose from as well. Readers won’t want to miss out on the latest vintages. Overall quality has never been higher.